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© Research
Publication : Journal of molecular biology

Developmental regulation of the aldolase A muscle-specific promoter during in vivo muscle maturation is controlled by a nuclear receptor binding element

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of molecular biology - 18 Jun 1999

Spitz F, Demignon J, Kahn A, Daegelen D, Maire P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10369770

J. Mol. Biol. 1999 Jun;289(4):893-903

During the post-natal period, skeletal muscles undergo important modifications leading to the appearance of different types of myofibers which exhibit distinct contractile and metabolic properties. This maturation process results from the activation of the expression of different sets of contractile proteins and metabolic enzymes, which are specific to the different types of myofibers. The muscle-specific promoter of the aldolase A gene (pM) is expressed mainly in fast-twitch glycolytic fibers in adult body muscles. We investigate here how pM is regulated during the post-natal development of different types of skeletal muscles (slow or fast-twitch muscles, head or body muscles). We show that pM is expressed preferentially in prospective fast-twitch muscles soon after birth; pM is up-regulated specifically in body muscles only later in development. This activation pattern is mimicked by a transgene which comprises only the 355 most proximal sequences of pM. Within this region, we identify a DNA element which is required for the up-regulation of the transgene during post-natal development in body muscles. Comparison of nuclear M1-binding proteins from young or adult body muscles show no qualitative differences. Distinct M1-binding proteins are present in both young and adult tongue nuclear extracts, compared to that present in gastrocnemius extracts.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10369770