Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of virological methods

Development of a simple and rapid protocol for the production of customized intertypic recombinant polioviruses

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of virological methods - 22 Aug 2012

Bessaud M, Delpeyroux F

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22939977

J. Virol. Methods 2012 Dec;186(1-2):104-8

The three attenuated strains Sabin are used as oral vaccine to immunize against poliomyelitis in many countries. Low vaccine coverage can allow these strains to circulate among non-immunized people, accumulating genetic modifications through nucleotide substitutions and recombination with non-polio enteroviruses. These modifications can induce a loss of attenuation, so promoting the emergence of pathogenic vaccine-derived polioviruses responsible for poliomyelitis outbreaks. In vitro-engineered chimeric viruses containing both Sabin and non-polio sequences constitute a powerful tool for understanding the constraints that drive and limit the recombination events between the Sabin strains and other enteroviruses and to understand the consequences on the viral phenotypic properties of substitutions of large genomic regions due to recombination events. A method was optimized that allowed the rapid production of customized Sabin-derived viruses. By using sequences from Sabin 2 and 3 polioviruses and from non-polio field enteroviruses, several recombinant genomes were engineered by using fusion PCR. The corresponding viruses were recovered after cell transfection. This method was found able to generate rapidly a wide range of unnatural viruses with multiple breakpoints that can be chosen precisely. Furthermore, this method is also suitable to engineer nucleotide deletions, insertions and/or substitutions within a given genome, so increasing the number of unnatural viruses that can be studied.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22939977