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© Artur Scherf
Scanning Electron Microscopy of Red Blood Cell infected by Plasmodium falciparum.
Publication : Biochimica et biophysica acta

Contribution of allergic inflammatory response to the pathogenesis of malaria disease

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Biochimica et biophysica acta - 23 Feb 2011

Mecheri S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21354307

Biochim. Biophys. Acta 2012 Jan;1822(1):49-56

Plasmodium falciparum, the aetiological agent of human lethal malaria, is responsible for over 2 million deaths per year and malaria episodes may vary considerably in their severity and clinical manifestations. Dysregulated balance of the inflammatory response and a defect in the anti-Plasmodium parasite immune response represent the hallmarks of malaria disease. Among the many possible mechanisms, it is now widely recognized that the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines and upregulation of endothelial cell adhesion molecules play important roles in malaria pathogenesis. We and others provided evidence that some components of allergic inflammatory response to malaria parasites or elicited by by-products of parasite infection may contribute to malaria pathogenesis. This review provides some clue regarding these mechanisms where mast cells and histamine, an inflammatory mediator generated following IgE-independent or IgE-mediated immune response, were found to play a major role in parasite transmission and malaria pathogenesis, respectively. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21354307