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© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : Disability and rehabilitation

Cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) benefits more to patients with schizophrenia with low initial memory performances

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Disability and rehabilitation - 11 Aug 2014

Pillet B, Morvan Y, Todd A, Franck N, Duboc C, Grosz A, Launay C, Demily C, Gaillard R, Krebs MO, Amado I

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25109501.

Disabil Rehabil 2015;37(10):846-53

PURPOSE: Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia mainly affect memory, attention and executive functions. Cognitive remediation is a technique derived from neuropsychology, which aims to improve or compensate for these deficits. Working memory, verbal learning, and executive functions are crucial factors for functional outcome. Our purpose was to assess the impact of the cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) program on cognitive difficulties in patients with schizophrenia, especially on working memory, verbal memory, and cognitive flexibility.

METHODS: We collected data from clinical and neuropsychological assessments in 24 patients suffering from schizophrenia (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental Disorders-Fourth Edition, DSM-IV) who followed a 3-month (CRT) program. Verbal and visuo-spatial working memory, verbal memory, and cognitive flexibility were assessed before and after CRT.

RESULTS: The Wilcoxon test showed significant improvements on the backward digit span, on the visual working memory span, on verbal memory and on flexibility. Cognitive improvement was substantial when baseline performance was low, independently from clinical benefit.

CONCLUSIONS: CRT is effective on crucial cognitive domains and provides a huge benefit for patients having low baseline performance. Such cognitive amelioration appears highly promising for improving the outcome in cognitively impaired patients.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25109501.