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© Marie Prévost, Institut Pasteur
Image of a portion of a Xenopus oocyte expressing a channel receptor.
Publication : Applied biochemistry and biotechnology

Chaperones are necessary for the expression of catalytically active potato apyrases in prokaryotic cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Applied biochemistry and biotechnology - 07 May 2014

Porowińska D, Czarnecka J, Komoszyński M

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24801402

Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 2014 Jul;173(6):1349-59

NTPDases (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases) (also called in plants apyrases) hydrolyze nucleoside 5′-tri- and/or diphosphate bonds producing nucleosides di or monophosphate and inorganic phosphate. For years, studies have been carried out to use both plant and animal enzymes for medicine. Therefore, there is a need to develop an efficient method for the quick production of large amounts of homogeneous proteins with high catalytic activity. Expression of proteins in prokaryotic cells is the most common way for the protein production. The aim of our study was to develop a method of expression of potato apyrase (StAPY4, 5, and 6) genes in bacterial cells under conditions that allowed the production of catalytically active form of these enzymes. Apyrase 4 and 6 were overexpressed in BL21-CodonPlus (DE3) bacteria strain but they were accumulated in inclusion bodies, regardless of the culture conditions and induction method. Co-expression of potato apyrases with molecular chaperones allowed the expression of catalytically active apyrase 5. However, its high nucleotidase activity could be toxic for bacteria and is therefore synthesized in small amounts in cells. Our studies show that each protein requires other conditions for maturation and even small differences in amino acid sequence can essentially affect protein folding regardless of presence of chaperones.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24801402