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© Research
Publication : Arthritis and rheumatism

Association of an IRF5 gene functional polymorphism with Sjögren’s syndrome

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Arthritis and rheumatism - 01 Dec 2007

Miceli-Richard C, Comets E, Loiseau P, Puechal X, Hachulla E, Mariette X

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18050197

Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Dec;56(12):3989-94

OBJECTIVE: Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF-5) is a transcription factor involved in the regulation of the host defense. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant association of various IRF5 gene polymorphisms with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Caucasians. The purpose of this case-control study was to investigate whether IRF5 polymorphisms are involved in the genetic predisposition to primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SS), an autoimmune disease closely related to SLE.

METHODS: We analyzed IRF5 rs2004640, rs2070197, rs10954213, and rs2280714 polymorphisms in a cohort of 212 primary SS patients and 162 healthy blood donors, all of whom were of Caucasian origin. The 4 polymorphisms examined were genotyped by competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction using fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology.

RESULTS: The IRF5 rs2004640 GT or TT genotype (T allele carriers) was identified in 87% of primary SS patients compared with 77% of controls (P = 0.01, odds ratio [OR] 1.93 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.15-3.42]). The IRF5 rs2004640 T allele was found on 59% of chromosomes from primary SS patients compared with 52% of chromosomes from controls (P = 0.04, OR 1.36 [95% CI 1.01-1.83]). No significant association of primary SS with rs2070197, rs10954213, or rs2280714 was seen when they were analyzed independently. Nevertheless, haplotype reconstructions based on the 4 polymorphisms examined suggest that various allele combinations of rs2004640 and rs2070197 could define susceptibility or protective haplotypes.

CONCLUSION: This study is the first to demonstrate a significant association between primary SS and the IRF5 rs2004640 T allele. These results, which require further replication on larger populations, suggest that besides their association with identical major histocompatibility complex gene polymorphisms, primary SS and SLE share IRF gene polymorphisms as a common genetic susceptibility factor.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18050197