Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases

Aggregation in malaria parasites places limits on mosquito infection rates

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases - 25 Apr 2007

Paul RE, Bonnet S, Boudin C, Tchuinkam T, Robert V

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 17521970

Infect. Genet. Evol. 2007 Sep;7(5):577-86

Gametocytes are responsible for the transmission of malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp., from man to mosquito. Although transmission success, as measured by the proportion of mosquitoes infected, generally increases with gametocyte density, the proportion of parasites that are gametocytes is always paradoxically only a few percent of the asexual blood parasites. To address this paradox, we analyse transmission data sets from an urban and an adjacent rural setting in Cameroon to elucidate whether there are discernable lower and upper limits to Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte density that are linked to transmission success. We find that there exists a lower gametocyte density at which mosquito infection rates considerably increase. In addition, we identify upper gametocyte densities at which mosquito infection rates level off. Greatest increases in infection rates occur at low gametocyte densities and coincide with maximum oocyst aggregation within the infected mosquito population. This aggregated oocyst distribution remains despite increases in gametocyte density and ever-decreasing gains in mosquito infection rates. There is increasing suggestion that malaria parasites have evolved sex allocation strategies to ensure transmission in response to a changing, transmission-blocking environment. Here transmission-blocking immunity is proposed not only to ensure low density gametocyte transmission success but also to impose upper limits on transmission success.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17521970