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© Research
Publication : The EMBO journal

A transcriptional network in polycystic kidney disease

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The EMBO journal - 18 Mar 2004

Gresh L, Fischer E, Reimann A, Tanguy M, Garbay S, Shao X, Hiesberger T, Fiette L, Igarashi P, Yaniv M, Pontoglio M

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15029248

EMBO J. 2004 Apr;23(7):1657-68

Mutations in cystic kidney disease genes represent a major genetic cause of end-stage renal disease. However, the molecular cascades controlling the expression of these genes are still poorly understood. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1beta (HNF1beta) is a homeoprotein predominantly expressed in renal, pancreatic and hepatic epithelia. We report here that mice with renal-specific inactivation of HNF1beta develop polycystic kidney disease. We show that renal cyst formation is accompanied by a drastic defect in the transcriptional activation of Umod, Pkhd1 and Pkd2 genes, whose mutations are responsible for distinct cystic kidney syndromes. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that HNF1beta binds to several DNA elements in murine Umod, Pkhd1, Pkd2 and Tg737/Polaris genomic sequences. Our results uncover a direct transcriptional hierarchy between HNF1beta and cystic disease genes. Interestingly, most of the identified HNF1beta target gene products colocalize to the primary cilium, a crucial organelle that plays an important role in controlling the proliferation of tubular cells. This may explain the increased proliferation of cystic cells in MODY5 patients carrying autosomal dominant mutations in HNF1beta.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15029248