Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Infection and immunity

A nonvirulent mutant of Listeria monocytogenes does not move intracellularly but still induces polymerization of actin

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Infection and immunity - 01 Nov 1990

Kuhn M, Prévost MC, Mounier J, Sansonetti PJ

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 2172164

Infect. Immun. 1990 Nov;58(11):3477-86

Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to penetrate and multiply within professional and nonprofessional phagocytic cells, such as the Caco-2 human enterocytelike cell line. It was shown recently that shortly after listeriae have been phagocytosed, the phagosomal membrane is dissolved, probably by the action of the bacterial cytolysin listeriolysin O. The listeriae, which are then lying obviously free in the cytoplasm, become surrounded by a coat of actin filaments within a few hours. Once formed, this layer of actin filaments is reorganized in an as yet unknown way to form polar tails, which seem to be associated to the generation of listerial movement inside the cytoplasm and in intercellular spread. By using transposon Tn916 mutagenesis, a bank of L. monocytogenes mutants was generated and subsequently screened by the plaque assay system in order to select an intracellular, nonmotile mutant of L. monocytogenes. One such mutant was identified. This mutant, called L. monocytogenes M117 Imt- (for intracellular motility), like the wild type, induced actin polymerization but was not able to rearrange the actin coat to generate movement and as a result remained entrapped within the actin cloud. In a mouse virulence assay, this strain was significantly reduced in virulence. L. monocytogenes M117 is the first example to date of a Listeria mutant which is still hemolytic and invasive but reduced in virulence.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2172164