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© Research
Publication : JAMA dermatology

A new TRPV3 missense mutation in a patient with Olmsted syndrome and erythromelalgia

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in JAMA dermatology - 01 Mar 2014

Duchatelet S, Pruvost S, de Veer S, Fraitag S, Nitschké P, Bole-Feysot C, Bodemer C, Hovnanian A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24452206

JAMA Dermatol 2014 Mar;150(3):303-6

IMPORTANCE: Olmsted syndrome (OS) is a rare keratinizing disorder characterized by excessive epidermal thickening of the palms and soles, with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Approximately 50 cases have been reported, with the molecular basis described in only 9. Recently, TRPV3 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 3) mutations were identified in autosomal-dominant OS in 7 sporadic cases and 1 familial case, whereas an MBTPS2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease, site 2) mutation was reported in X-linked recessive OS. We report a new sporadic case of severe, atypical OS and its underlying genetic basis.

OBSERVATIONS: Our patient is a young girl with severe nonmutilating (palmo)plantar keratoderma without periorificial keratotic plaques associated with intense acute flares of inflammation, itching, burning pain, vasodilatation, and redness of the extremities consistent with erythromelalgia. Whole exome sequencing of patient DNA identified a novel de novo heterozygous missense mutation within TRPV3, p.Leu673Phe, predicted to be damaging.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This case study further implicates TRPV3 in OS pathogenesis. In addition, previous reports of OS have not described erythromelalgia as a clinical feature. Its occurrence in our patient could be a chance event, but, if associated with OS, the features of erythromelalgia may expand the phenotypic spectrum of this rare syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24452206