Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Mélanie Falord, Tarek Msadek, Jean-Marc Panaud
Staphylococcus aureus "golden staph" in scanning electron microscopy.
Publication : Journal of bacteriology

A naturally occurring gene amplification leading to sulfonamide and trimethoprim resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of bacteriology - 16 Nov 2007

Brochet M, Couvé E, Zouine M, Poyart C, Glaser P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18024520

J. Bacteriol. 2008 Jan;190(2):672-80

Gene amplifications have been detected as a transitory phenomenon in bacterial cultures. They are predicted to contribute to rapid adaptation by simultaneously increasing the expression of genes clustered on the chromosome. However, genome amplifications have rarely been described in natural isolates. Through DNA array analysis, we have identified two Streptococcus agalactiae strains carrying tandem genome amplifications: a fourfold amplification of 13.5 kb and a duplication of 92 kb. Both amplifications were located close to the terminus of replication and originated independently from any long repeated sequence. They probably arose in the human host and showed different stabilities, the 13.5-kb amplification being lost at a frequency of 0.003 per generation and the 92-kb tandem duplication at a frequency of 0.035 per generation. The 13.5-kb tandem amplification carried the five genes required for dihydrofolate biosynthesis and led to both trimethoprim (TMP) and sulfonamide (SU) resistance. Resistance to SU probably resulted from the increased synthesis of dihydropteroate synthase, the target of this antibiotic, whereas the amplification of the whole pathway was responsible for TMP resistance. This revealed a new mechanism of resistance to TMP involving an increased dihydrofolate biosynthesis. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of naturally occurring antibiotic resistance resulting from genome amplification in bacteria. The low stability of DNA segment amplifications suggests that their role in antibiotic resistance might have been underestimated.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18024520