Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Nucleic acids research

A minimal bacterial RNase J-based degradosome is associated with translating ribosomes

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Nucleic acids research - 22 Oct 2012

Redko Y, Aubert S, Stachowicz A, Lenormand P, Namane A, Darfeuille F, Thibonnier M, De Reuse H

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23093592

Nucleic Acids Res. 2013 Jan;41(1):288-301

Protein complexes directing messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation are present in all kingdoms of life. In Escherichia coli, mRNA degradation is performed by an RNA degradosome organized by the major ribonuclease RNase E. In bacteria lacking RNase E, the existence of a functional RNA degradosome is still an open question. Here, we report that in the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori, RNA degradation is directed by a minimal RNA degradosome consisting of Hp-RNase J and the only DExD-box RNA helicase of H. pylori, RhpA. We show that the protein complex promotes faster degradation of double-stranded RNA in vitro in comparison with Hp-RNase J alone. The ATPase activity of RhpA is stimulated in the presence of Hp-RNase J, demonstrating that the catalytic capacity of both partners is enhanced upon interaction. Remarkably, both proteins are associated with translating ribosomes and not with individual 30S and 50S subunits. Moreover, Hp-RNase J is not recruited to ribosomes to perform rRNA maturation. Together, our findings imply that in H. pylori, the mRNA-degrading machinery is associated with the translation apparatus, a situation till now thought to be restricted to eukaryotes and archaea.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23093592