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© Christine Schmitt, Meriem El Ghachi, Jean-Marc Panaud
Bactérie Helicobacter pylori en microscopie électronique à balayage. Agent causal de pathologies de l'estomac : elle est responsable des gastrites chroniques, d'ulcères gastriques et duodénaux et elle joue un rôle important dans la genèse des cancers gastriques (adénocarcinomes et lymphomes).
Publication : Journal of proteomics

A glimpse into the modulation of post-translational modifications of human-colonizing bacteria

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of proteomics - 23 Nov 2016

Bastos PAD, da Costa JP, Vitorino R

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 27888141

J Proteomics 2017 01;152:254-275

Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) are a key bacterial feature that holds the capability to modulate protein function and responses to environmental cues. Until recently, their role in the regulation of prokaryotic systems has been largely neglected. However, the latest developments in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have allowed an unparalleled identification and quantification of proteins and peptides that undergo PTMs in bacteria, including in species which directly or indirectly affect human health. Herein, we address this issue by carrying out the largest and most comprehensive global pooling and comparison of PTM peptides and proteins from bacterial species performed to date. Data was collected from 91 studies relating to PTM bacterial peptides or proteins identified by mass spectrometry-based methods. The present analysis revealed that there was a considerable overlap between PTMs across species, especially between acetylation and other PTMs, particularly succinylation. Phylogenetically closer species may present more overlapping phosphoproteomes, but environmental triggers also contribute to this proximity. PTMs among bacteria were found to be extremely versatile and diverse, meaning that the same protein may undergo a wide variety of different modifications across several species, but it could also suffer different modifications within the same species.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27888141