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© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

A direct intracranial record of emotions evoked by subliminal words

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 16 May 2005

Naccache L, Gaillard R, Adam C, Hasboun D, Clémenceau S, Baulac M, Dehaene S, Cohen L

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15897465.

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2005 May;102(21):7713-7

A classical but still open issue in cognitive psychology concerns the depth of subliminal processing. Can the meaning of undetected words be accessed in the absence of consciousness? Subliminal priming experiments in normal subjects have revealed only small effects whose interpretation remains controversial. Here, we provide a direct demonstration of semantic access for unseen masked words. In three epileptic patients with intracranial electrodes, we recorded brain potentials from the amygdala, a neural structure that responds to fearful or threatening stimuli presented in various modalities, including written words. We show that the subliminal presentation of emotional words modulates the activity of the amygdala at a long latency (>800 ms). Our result indicates that subliminal words can trigger long-lasting cerebral processes, including semantic access to emotional valence.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15897465.