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© Marion Coolen
Radial glia neural stem cells of the adult zebrafish telencephalon electroporated with a membrane tagged GFP
Publication : Cell

A Common Embryonic Origin of Stem Cells Drives Developmental and Adult Neurogenesis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Cell - 13 Mar 2019

Berg DA, Su Y, Jimenez-Cyrus D, Patel A, Huang N, Morizet D, Lee S, Shah R, Ringeling FR, Jain R, Epstein JA, Wu QF, Canzar S, Ming GL, Song H, Bond AM

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 30929900

Cell 2019 Mar;

New neurons arise from quiescent adult neural progenitors throughout life in specific regions of the mammalian brain. Little is known about the embryonic origin and establishment of adult neural progenitors. Here, we show that Hopx precursors in the mouse dentate neuroepithelium at embryonic day 11.5 give rise to proliferative Hopx neural progenitors in the primitive dentate region, and they, in turn, generate granule neurons, but not other neurons, throughout development and then transition into Hopx quiescent radial glial-like neural progenitors during an early postnatal period. RNA-seq and ATAC-seq analyses of Hopx embryonic, early postnatal, and adult dentate neural progenitors further reveal common molecular and epigenetic signatures and developmental dynamics. Together, our findings support a “continuous” model wherein a common neural progenitor population exclusively contributes to dentate neurogenesis throughout development and adulthood. Adult dentate neurogenesis may therefore represent a lifelong extension of development that maintains heightened plasticity in the mammalian hippocampus.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30929900