Tapez votre recherche ici
  • Équipes
  • Membres
  • Projets
  • Événements
  • Appels
  • Emplois
  • publications
  • Logiciel
  • Outils
  • Réseau
  • Équipement
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Recherche
Revenir
Haut de page
Partagez
© Structural Dynamics Of Macromolecules
The structure of a bacterial analog of the nicotinic receptor (one color per subunit) inserted into the cell membrane (grey and orange). A representation of the volume accessible to ions is shown in yellow.
Publication :

The Renormalization Group and Its Applications to Generating Coarse-Grained Models of Large Biological Molecular Systems.

Domaines Scientifiques
Maladies
Organismes
Applications
Technique

Publié sur - 14 Mar 2017

Koehl P, Poitevin F, Navaza R, Delarue M.

J Chem Theory Comput. 2017 Mar 14;13(3):1424-1438.

Understanding the dynamics of biomolecules is the key to understanding their biological activities. Computational methods ranging from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to coarse-grained normal-mode analyses based on simplified elastic networks provide a general framework to studying these dynamics. Despite recent successes in studying very large systems with up to a 100,000,000 atoms, those methods are currently limited to studying small- to medium-sized molecular systems due to computational limitations. One solution to circumvent these limitations is to reduce the size of the system under study. In this paper, we argue that coarse-graining, the standard approach to such size reduction, must define a hierarchy of models of decreasing sizes that are consistent with each other, i.e., that each model contains the information of the dynamics of its predecessor. We propose a new method, Decimate, for generating such a hierarchy within the context of elastic networks for normal-mode analysis. This method is based on the concept of the renormalization group developed in statistical physics. We highlight the details of its implementation, with a special focus on its scalability to large systems of up to millions of atoms. We illustrate its application on two large systems, the capsid of a virus and the ribosome translation complex. We show that highly decimated representations of those systems, containing down to 1% of their original number of atoms, still capture qualitatively and quantitatively their dynamics. Decimate is available as an OpenSource resource.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28170254