Tapez votre recherche ici
  • Équipes
  • Membres
  • Projets
  • Événements
  • Appels
  • Emplois
  • publications
  • Logiciel
  • Outils
  • Réseau
  • Équipement

Un petit guide pour l'utilisation de la recherche avancée :

  • Tip 1. Utilisez "" afin de chercher une expression exacte.
    Exemple : "division cellulaire"
  • Tip 2. Utilisez + afin de rendre obligatoire la présence d'un mot.
    Exemple : +cellule +stem
  • Tip 3. Utilisez + et - afin de forcer une inclusion ou exclusion d'un mot.
    Exemple : +cellule -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Rechercher
Compteur
IN
OUT
Contenu 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche Expert
  • Directeur(trice) de Recherche
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Manager de département
  • Professeur(e)
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Pharmacien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Vétérinaire
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Plateforme
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable opérationnel et administratif
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Contenu 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche Expert
  • Directeur(trice) de Recherche
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Manager de département
  • Professeur(e)
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Pharmacien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Vétérinaire
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Plateforme
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable opérationnel et administratif
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Recherche
Revenir
Haut de page
Partagez
© Recherche
Publication : Biochimie

The multiple facets of homology and their use in comparative genomics to study the evolution of genes, genomes, and species

Domaines Scientifiques
Maladies
Organismes
Applications
Technique

Publié sur Biochimie - 22 Sep 2007

Descorps-Declère S, Lemoine F, Sculo Q, Lespinet O, Labedan B

Lien vers Pubmed [PMID] – 17961904

Biochimie 2008 Apr;90(4):595-608

The incredible development of comparative genomics during the last decade has required a correct use of the concept of homology that was previously utilized only by evolutionary biologists. Unhappily, this concept has been often misunderstood and thus misused when exploited outside its evolutionary context. This review brings back to the correct definition of homology and explains how this definition has been progressively refined in order to adapt it to the various new kinds of analysis of gene properties and of their products that appear with the progress of comparative genomics. Then, we illustrate the power and the proficiency of such a concept when using the available genomics data in order to study the evolution of individual genes, of entire genomes and of species, respectively. After explaining how we detect homologues by an exhaustive comparison of a hundred of complete proteomes, we describe three main lines of research we have developed in the recent years. The first one exploits synteny and gene context data to better understand the mechanisms of genome evolution in prokaryotes. The second one is based on phylogenomics approaches to reconstruct the tree of life. The last one is devoted to reminding that protein homology is often limited to structural segments (SOH=segment of homology or module). Detecting and numbering modules allows tracing back protein history by identifying the events of gene duplication and gene fusion. We insist that one of the main present difficulties in such studies is a lack of a reliable method to identify genuine orthologues. Finally, we show how these homology studies are helpful to annotate genes and genomes and to study the complexity of the relationships between sequence and function of a gene.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17961904