Tapez votre recherche ici
  • Équipes
  • Membres
  • Projets
  • Événements
  • Appels
  • Emplois
  • publications
  • Logiciel
  • Outils
  • Réseau
  • Équipement

Un petit guide pour l'utilisation de la recherche avancée :

  • Tip 1. Utilisez "" afin de chercher une expression exacte.
    Exemple : "division cellulaire"
  • Tip 2. Utilisez + afin de rendre obligatoire la présence d'un mot.
    Exemple : +cellule +stem
  • Tip 3. Utilisez + et - afin de forcer une inclusion ou exclusion d'un mot.
    Exemple : +cellule -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Compteur
IN
OUT
Contenu 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche Expert
  • Directeur(trice) de Recherche
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Professeur(e)
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Pharmacien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Vétérinaire
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Plateforme
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable opérationnel et administratif
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Contenu 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche Expert
  • Directeur(trice) de Recherche
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Professeur(e)
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Pharmacien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Vétérinaire
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Plateforme
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable opérationnel et administratif
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Recherche
Revenir
Haut de page
Partagez
© Recherche
Publication : Developmental biology

Regulation and phylogeny of skeletal muscle regeneration

Domaines Scientifiques
Maladies
Organismes
Applications
Technique

Publié sur Developmental biology - 12 Aug 2017

Baghdadi MB, Tajbakhsh S

Lien vers Pubmed [PMID] – 28811217

Dev. Biol. 2018 01;433(2):200-209

One of the most fascinating questions in regenerative biology is why some animals can regenerate injured structures while others cannot. Skeletal muscle has a remarkable capacity to regenerate even after repeated traumas, yet limited information is available on muscle repair mechanisms and how they have evolved. For decades, the main focus in the study of muscle regeneration was on muscle stem cells, however, their interaction with their progeny and stromal cells is only starting to emerge, and this is crucial for successful repair and re-establishment of homeostasis after injury. In addition, numerous murine injury models are used to investigate the regeneration process, and some can lead to discrepancies in observed phenotypes. This review addresses these issues and provides an overview of some of the main regulatory cellular and molecular players involved in skeletal muscle repair.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28811217