Tapez votre recherche ici
  • Équipes
  • Membres
  • Projets
  • Événements
  • Appels
  • Emplois
  • publications
  • Logiciel
  • Outils
  • Réseau
  • Équipement

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Recherche
Revenir
Haut de page
Partagez
© Recherche
Événement

Pr. Erich Bornberg-Bauer: Emergence of de novo protein coding genes from ‘dark genomic matter’ — fact or fiction? – C3BI Seminar

Domaines Scientifiques
Maladies
Organismes
Applications
Technique
Date
09
Nov 2017
Heure
14:00:00
Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
Address
Bâtiment: Francois Jacob -BIME Salle: Auditorium Francois JACOB
Localisation
2017-11-09 14:00:00 2017-11-09 15:00:00 Europe/Paris Pr. Erich Bornberg-Bauer: Emergence of de novo protein coding genes from ‘dark genomic matter’ — fact or fiction? – C3BI Seminar Proteins are the workhorses of the cell and, over billions of years, they have evolved an amazing plethora of extremely diverse and versatile structures with equally diverse functions. Therefore, their evolution echoes the evolution of all forms […] Institut Pasteur, Paris, France

Présentation

Proteins are the workhorses of the cell and, over billions of years, they have evolved an amazing plethora of extremely diverse and versatile structures with equally diverse functions. Therefore, their evolution echoes the evolution of all forms of life. Evolutionary emergence of new proteins and transitions between existing ones are widely believed to be rare or even impossible.

However, recent advances in comparative genomics have repeatedly called some 10%-30% of all genes without any detectable similarity to existing proteins. Even after careful scrutiny, some of those “orphan” genes contain protein coding reading frames with detectable transcription and translation. Thus some proteins seem to have emerged from previously non-coding ‘dark genomic matter’. These ‘de novo’ proteins tend to be disordered, fast evolving, weakly expressed but also rapidly assuming novel and physiologically important functions. I will review mechanisms by which ‘de novo’ proteins might be created, under which circumstances they may become fixed and why they are elusive.

I will present a couple of studies which mostly focus on metazoan genomes.

 

Localisation

Bâtiment: Francois Jacob -BIME
Salle: Auditorium Francois JACOB
Address: Institut Pasteur, Paris, France