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© Charles DAUGUET, Institut Pasteur
HIV particles
Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Blood - 09 Nov 2004

Balabanian K, Lagane B, Pablos JL, Laurent L, Planchenault T, Verola O, Lebbe C, Kerob D, Dupuy A, Hermine O, Nicolas JF, Latger-Cannard V, Bensoussan D, Bordigoni P, Baleux F, Le Deist F, Virelizier JL, Arenzana-Seisdedos F, Bachelerie F

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15536153

Blood 2005 Mar;105(6):2449-57

The WHIM syndrome is a rare immunodeficiency disorder characterized by warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, and myelokathexis. Dominant heterozygous mutations of the gene encoding CXCR4, a G-protein-coupled receptor with a unique ligand, CXCL12, have been associated with this pathology. We studied patients belonging to 3 different pedigrees. Two siblings inherited a CXCR4 mutation encoding a novel C-terminally truncated receptor. Two unrelated patients were found to bear a wild-type CXCR4 open reading frame. Circulating lymphocytes and neutrophils from all patients displayed similar functional alterations of CXCR4-mediated responses featured by a marked enhancement of G-protein-dependent responses. This phenomenon relies on the refractoriness of CXCR4 to be both desensitized and internalized in response to CXCL12. Therefore, the aberrant dysfunction of the CXCR4-mediated signaling constitutes a common biologic trait of WHIM syndromes with different causative genetic anomalies. Responses to other chemokines, namely CCL4, CCL5, and CCL21, were preserved, suggesting that, in clinical forms associated with a wild-type CXCR4 open reading frame, the genetic anomaly might target an effector with some degree of selectivity for the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis. We propose that the sustained CXCR4 activity in patient cells accounts for the immune-hematologic clinical manifestations and the profusion of warts characteristic of the WHIM syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15536153