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© Sandrine Etienne-Manneville
Photo prise à l'avant (dans la protrusion) d'astrocytes primaires de rat en migration. Marquage par immunofluorescence montrant en rouge, p150 Glued, une protéine associée aux extrémités 'plus' des microtubules et en vert la tubuline des microtubules. La photographie montre l'accumulation de p150 Glued à l'avant des cellules en migration, où la protéine pourrait participer à l'ancrage des microtubules à la membrane plasmique. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaires.
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Use of allostery to identify inhibitors of calmodulin-induced activation of Bacillus anthracis edema factor

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 07 Jun 2010

Laine E, Goncalves C, Karst JC, Lesnard A, Rault S, Tang WJ, Malliavin TE, Ladant D, Blondel A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 20534570

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2010 Jun;107(25):11277-82

Allostery plays a key role in the regulation of the activity and function of many biomolecules. And although many ligands act through allostery, no systematic use is made of it in drug design strategies. Here we describe a procedure for identifying the regions of a protein that can be used to control its activity through allostery. This procedure is based on the construction of a plausible conformational path, which describes protein transition between known active and inactive conformations. The path is calculated by using a framework approach that steers and markedly improves the conjugate peak refinement method. The evolution of conformations along this path was used to identify a putative allosteric site that could regulate activation of Bacillus anthracis adenylyl cyclase toxin (EF) by calmodulin. Conformations of the allosteric site at different steps along the path from the inactive (free) to the active (bound to calmodulin) forms of EF were used to perform virtual screenings and propose candidate EF inhibitors. Several candidates then proved to inhibit calmodulin-induced activation in an in vitro assay. The most potent compound fully inhibited EF at a concentration of 10 microM. The compounds also inhibited the related adenylyl cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis (CyaA). The specific homology between the putative allosteric sites in both toxins supports that these pockets are the actual binding sites of the selected inhibitors.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20534570