Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)

Truncated CXCL10 is associated with failure to achieve spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C infection

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.) - 19 May 2014

Riva A, Laird M, Casrouge A, Ambrozaitis A, Williams R, Naoumov NV, Albert ML, Chokshi S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24668726

Hepatology 2014 Aug;60(2):487-96

UNLABELLED: The pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is strongly influenced by the nature of the host’s antiviral immunity. Counterintuitively, elevated serum concentrations of C-X-C chemokine 10 (CXCL10), a potent chemoattractant for antiviral T-cells and NK-cells, are associated with poor treatment outcomes in patients with chronic HCV. It has been reported that an N-terminal truncated form of CXCL10, generated by the protease dipeptidylpeptidase 4 (DPP4), can act as chemokine antagonist. We sought to investigate CXCL10 antagonism in the clinical outcome and evolution of acute HCV infection. We collected serial blood samples from 16 patients, at the clinical onset of acute HCV infection and at 12 standardized follow-up timepoints over the first year. Intact and truncated CXCL10 and DPP4 activity were quantified in all longitudinal samples. In addition, NK-cell frequency/phenotype, and HCV-specific T-cell responses were assessed. Subjects developing chronicity (n = 11) had higher concentrations of CXCL10 (P < 0.001), which was predominantly in a truncated form (P = 0.036) compared to patients who spontaneously resolved infection (n = 5). Truncated CXCL10 correlated with HCV-RNA (r = 0.40, P < 0.001) and DPP4 activity (r = 0.53, P < 0.001). Subjects who resolved infection had a higher frequency of HCV-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing T-cells (P = 0.017) and predominance of cytotoxic NK-cells (P = 0.005) compared to patients who became chronic. Patients who became persistently infected had higher proportions of cytokine-producing NK-cells, which were correlated with concentrations of truncated CXCL10 (r = 0.92, P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: This study provides the first evidence of chemokine antagonism during acute HCV infection. We suggest that the DPP4-CXCL10 axis inhibits antiviral innate and adaptive host immunity and favors establishment of viral persistence.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24668726