Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Jacob SEELER & Anne DEJEAN, Institut Pasteur
Immunostaining of PML nuclear bodies involved in acute promyelocytic leukemia
Publication : Blood

Trivalent antimonials induce degradation of the PML-RAR oncoprotein and reorganization of the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies in acute promyelocytic leukemia NB4 cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Blood - 01 Dec 1998

Müller S, Miller WH, Dejean A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 9834237

Blood 1998 Dec;92(11):4308-16

Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by a specific t(15;17) chromosomal translocation that fuses the genes encoding the promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) and the retinoic acid receptor (RAR). The resulting PML-RAR protein induces a block in the differentiation of the myeloid progenitor cells, which can be released by retinoic acid (RA) in vitro and in vivo. The RA-induced differentiation of APL blasts is paralleled by the degradation of the fusion protein and the relocation of wild-type PML from aberrant nuclear structures to its normal localization in nuclear bodies. Recently, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) treatment was proposed as an alternative therapy in APL, because it can induce complete remission in both RA-sensitive and -resistant APL patients. Intriguingly, As2O3 was also shown to induce degradation of the PML-RAR chimera and to reorganize PML nuclear bodies. Here we show that trivalent antimonials also have striking effects on RA-sensitive and RA-resistant APL cells. Treatment of the APL-derived NB4 cells and the RA-resistant subclone NB4R4 with antimony trioxide or potassium antimonyl tartrat triggers the degradation of the fusion protein and the concomitant reorganization of the PML nuclear bodies. In addition, as reported for As2O3, the antimonials provoke apoptosis of NB4 and NB4R4 cells. The mechanism of antimony action is likely to be similar to that of As2O3, notably both substances induce the attachment of the ubiquitin-like SUMO-1 molecule to the PML moiety of PML-RAR. From these data, we propose that, in analogy to As2O3, antimonials might have a beneficial therapeutic effect on APL patients, perhaps with less toxicity than arsenic.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9834237