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© Research
Publication :

The salivary glands and saliva of Anopheles gambiae as an essential step in the Plasmodium life cycle: a global proteomic study.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in - 07 Sep 2007

Choumet V, Carmi-Leroy A, Laurent C, Lenormand P, Rousselle JC, Namane A, Roth C, Brey PT.

Proteomics. 2007 Sep;7(18):3384-94.

Proteins synthesized in the salivary glands of the Anopheles gambiae mosquito are thought to be important in the life cycle of the malaria parasite Plasmodium. To describe A. gambiae salivary gland and saliva contents, we combined several techniques: 1-DE, 2-DE and LC MS/MS. This study has identified five saliva proteins and 122 more proteins from the salivary glands, including the first proteomic description for 89 of these salivary gland proteins. Since the invasion and sporozoite maturation take place during the process of salivary glands ageing, the effect of salivary gland age on salivary component composition was examined. LC MS/MS profiling of young versus old salivary gland proteomes suggests that there is an over-representation of proteins involved in signaling and proteins related to the immune response in the proteins from older mosquitoes. The iTRAQ labeling was used for a comparative proteomic analysis of salivary gland samples from infected or Plasmodium berghei-free mosquitoes. The expression levels of five secreted proteins were altered when the parasite was present. These observations will serve as a basis for future work concerning the possible role of these proteins in the interaction between A. gambiae, Plasmodium and the mammalian host.