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© Research
Publication : Nature communications

The rainbow trout genome provides novel insights into evolution after whole-genome duplication in vertebrates.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Nature communications - 22 Apr 2014

Berthelot C, Brunet F, Chalopin D, Juanchich A, Bernard M, Noël B, Bento P, Da Silva C, Labadie K, Alberti A, Aury JM, Louis A, Dehais P, Bardou P, Montfort J, Klopp C, Cabau C, Gaspin C, Thorgaard GH, Boussaha M, Quillet E, Guyomard R, Galiana D, Bobe J, Volff JN, Genêt C, Wincker P, Jaillon O, Roest Crollius H, Guiguen Y,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24755649

Link to DOI – 10.1038/ncomms4657

Nat Commun 2014 Apr; 5(): 3657

Vertebrate evolution has been shaped by several rounds of whole-genome duplications (WGDs) that are often suggested to be associated with adaptive radiations and evolutionary innovations. Due to an additional round of WGD, the rainbow trout genome offers a unique opportunity to investigate the early evolutionary fate of a duplicated vertebrate genome. Here we show that after 100 million years of evolution the two ancestral subgenomes have remained extremely collinear, despite the loss of half of the duplicated protein-coding genes, mostly through pseudogenization. In striking contrast is the fate of miRNA genes that have almost all been retained as duplicated copies. The slow and stepwise rediploidization process characterized here challenges the current hypothesis that WGD is followed by massive and rapid genomic reorganizations and gene deletions.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24755649