Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Molecular biology and evolution

The multiple evolutionary histories of dioxygen reductases: Implications for the origin and evolution of aerobic respiration

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular biology and evolution - 29 Oct 2008

Brochier-Armanet C, Talla E, Gribaldo S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18974088

Mol. Biol. Evol. 2009 Feb;26(2):285-97

Understanding the origin and evolution of cellular processes is fundamental to understand how biological activity has shaped the history of our planet. Among these, aerobic respiration is probably one of the most debated. We have applied a phylogenomics approach to investigate the origin and evolution of dioxygen reductases (O(2)Red), the key enzymes of aerobic respiratory chains. The distribution and phylogenetic analysis of the four types of O(2)Red (Cyt-bd and the A, B, and C families of heme-copper O(2)Red) from 673 complete bacterial and archaeal genomes show that these enzymes have very different evolutionary histories: Cyt-bd are of bacterial origin and were transferred to a few archaea; C-O(2)Red are of proteobacterial origin and were transferred to a few other bacteria; B-O(2)Red are of archaeal origin and were transferred to a few bacteria; and A-O(2)Red are the most ancient O(2)Red and were already present prior to the divergence of major present-day bacterial and archaeal phyla, thus before the emergence of Cyanobacteria and oxygenic photosynthesis. Implications for the origin and the evolution of aerobic respiration are discussed.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18974088