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© Mart Krupovic, Junfeng Liu
Scanning electron micrograph of Saccharolobus islandicus cells (light blue) infected with the lemon-shaped virus STSV2 (yellow). Artistic rendering by Ala Krupovic.
Publication : Cell Host & Microbe

The logic of virus evolution

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Cell Host & Microbe - 13 Jul 2022

Koonin EV, Dolja VV, Krupovic M

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 35834963

Link to DOI – S1931-3128(22)00313-410.1016/j.chom.2022.06.008

Cell Host Microbe 2022; 30(7): 917-929

Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites. Despite their dependence on host cells, viruses are evolutionarily autonomous, with their own genomes and evolutionary trajectories locked in arms races with the hosts. Here, we discuss a simple functional logic to explain virus macroevolution that appears to define the course of virus evolution. A small core of virus hallmark genes that are responsible for genome replication apparently descended from primordial replicators, whereas most virus genes, starting with those encoding capsid proteins, were subsequently acquired from hosts. The oldest of these acquisitions antedate the last universal cellular ancestor (LUCA). Host gene capture followed two major routes: convergent recruitment of genes with functions that directly benefit virus reproduction and exaptation when host proteins are repurposed for unique virus functions. These forms of host protein recruitment by viruses result in different levels of similarity between virus and host homologs, with the exapted ones often changing beyond easy recognition.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35834963