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© Christine Schmitt, Meriem El Ghachi, Jean-Marc Panaud
Bactérie Helicobacter pylori en microscopie électronique à balayage. Agent causal de pathologies de l'estomac : elle est responsable des gastrites chroniques, d'ulcères gastriques et duodénaux et elle joue un rôle important dans la genèse des cancers gastriques (adénocarcinomes et lymphomes).
Publication : Microbes and infection / Institut Pasteur

Role of Nods in bacterial infection

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Microbes and infection / Institut Pasteur - 27 Jan 2007

Bourhis LL, Werts C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 17379560

Microbes Infect. 2007 Apr;9(5):629-36

Research into intracellular sensing of microbial products is an up and coming field in innate immunity. Nod1 and Nod2 are members of the rapidly expanding family of NACHT domain-containing proteins involved in intracellular recognition of bacterial products. Nods proteins are involved in the cytosolic detection of peptidoglycan motifs of bacteria, recognized through the LRR domain. The role of the NACHT-LRR system of detection in innate immune responses is highlighted at the mucosal barrier, where most of the membranous Toll like receptors (TLRs) are not expressed, or with pathogens that have devised ways to escape TLR sensing. For a given pathogen, the sum of the pathways induced by the recognition of the different “pathogen associated molecular patterns” (PAMPs) by the different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) trigger and shape the subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses. Knowledge gathered during the last decade on PRR and their agonists, and recent studies on bacterial infections provide new insights into the immune response and the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17379560