Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Molecular biology of the cell

PrP(C) association with lipid rafts in the early secretory pathway stabilizes its cellular conformation

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular biology of the cell - 30 Jun 2004

Sarnataro D, Campana V, Paladino S, Stornaiuolo M, Nitsch L, Zurzolo C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15229281

Mol. Biol. Cell 2004 Sep;15(9):4031-42

The pathological conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the scrapie prion protein (PrP(Sc)) isoform appears to have a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, the identity of the intracellular compartment where this conversion occurs is unknown. Several lines of evidence indicate that detergent-resistant membrane domains (DRMs or rafts) could be involved in this process. We have characterized the association of PrP(C) to rafts during its biosynthesis. We found that PrP(C) associates with rafts already as an immature precursor in the endoplasmic reticulum. Interestingly, compared with the mature protein, the immature diglycosylated form has a different susceptibility to cholesterol depletion vs. sphingolipid depletion, suggesting that the two forms associate with different lipid domains. We also found that cholesterol depletion, which affects raft-association of the immature protein, slows down protein maturation and leads to protein misfolding. On the contrary, sphingolipid depletion does not have any effect on the kinetics of protein maturation or on the conformation of the protein. These data indicate that the early association of PrP(C) with cholesterol-enriched rafts facilitates its correct folding and reinforce the hypothesis that cholesterol and sphingolipids have different roles in PrP metabolism.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15229281