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© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : Blood

Proper desensitization of CXCR4 is required for lymphocyte development and peripheral compartmentalization in mice

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Blood - 20 Mar 2012

Balabanian K, Brotin E, Biajoux V, Bouchet-Delbos L, Lainey E, Fenneteau O, Bonnet D, Fiette L, Emilie D, Bachelerie F

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22438253

Blood 2012 Jun;119(24):5722-30

Desensitization controls G protein-dependent signaling of chemokine receptors. We investigate the physiologic implication of this process for CXCR4 in a mouse model harboring a heterozygous mutation of the Cxcr4 gene, which engenders a desensitization-resistant receptor. Such anomaly is linked to the warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis (WHIM) syndrome, a human rare combined immunodeficiency. Cxcr4(+/mutant(1013)) mice display leukocytes with enhanced responses to Cxcl12 and exhibit leukopenia as reported in patients. Treatment with CXCL12/CXCR4 antagonists transiently reverses blood anomalies, further demonstrating the causal role of the mutant receptor in the leukopenia. Strikingly, neutropenia occurs in a context of normal bone marrow architecture and granulocyte lineage maturation, indicating a minor role for Cxcr4-dependent signaling in those processes. In contrast, Cxcr4(+/1013) mice show defective thymopoiesis and B-cell development, accounting for circulating lymphopenia. Concomitantly, mature T and B cells are abnormally compartmentalized in the periphery, with a reduction of primary follicles in the spleen and their absence in lymph nodes mirrored by an unfurling of the T-cell zone. These mice provide a model to decipher the role of CXCR4 desensitization in the homeostasis of B and T cells and to investigate which manifestations of patients with WHIM syndrome may be overcome by dampening the gain of CXCR4 function.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22438253