Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Clinics and research in hepatology and gastroenterology

Primary liver cancer is more aggressive in HIV-HCV coinfection than in HCV infection. A prospective study (ANRS CO13 Hepavih and CO12 Cirvir)

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Clinics and research in hepatology and gastroenterology - 19 Dec 2011

Bourcier V, Winnock M, Ait Ahmed M, Sogni P, Pambrun E, Poizot-Martin I, Chaffaut C, Chevret S, Trinchet JC, Salmon D, ,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22189509

Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol 2012 Jun;36(3):214-21

OBJECTIVE: Since HAART, primary liver cancer has emerged as an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Our aim was to compare characteristics and outcome of primary liver cancer according to HIV status in HCV cirrhotic patients submitted to periodic ultrasonographic surveillance.

METHODS: All patients with primary liver cancer and cirrhosis were selected from two prospective cohorts (ANRS CO12 Cirvir, viral cirrhosis, n=1081; ANRS CO13 Hepavih, HIV-HCV coinfection, n=1175). Cirrhosis was diagnosed by liver biopsy in monoHCV group and biopsy and/or non-invasive tests in HIV-HCV group. Ultrasonographic surveillance was performed every 6 months. Diagnosis of primary liver cancer was established according to EASL-AASLD guidelines.

RESULTS: Primary liver cancer was diagnosed in 32 patients, 16 in each group, and corresponded to hepatocellular carcinoma in all except for two cholangiocarcinomas in HIV-HCV patients. Ultrasonographic follow-up was similar (median time since last ultrasonographic without focal lesion: 237 days in HIV-HCV group (n=12) versus 208 days in HCV group, NS). At primary liver cancer diagnosis HIV-HCV patients were markedly younger (48 vs. 60 yrs, P<0.001), primary liver cancer was more advanced in HIV-HCV patients (single nodule: 43% vs. 75%, P=0.07; mean diameter of main nodule: 24 vs. 16 mm, P=0.006; portal obstruction: 3 vs. 0). Curative treatment was performed in four HIV-HCV patients versus 11 HCV patients (P=0.017). During follow-up, 10 HIV-HCV patients died versus only one HCV patient (P=0.0005).

CONCLUSIONS: This result suggests more aggressiveness for tumors in HIV infected patients and, if confirmed, could result in shortening the length between ultrasonographic examinations.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22189509