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© Research
Publication : Scientific reports

Mycobacterial infection induces a specific human innate immune response

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Scientific reports - 20 Nov 2015

Blischak JD, Tailleux L, Mitrano A, Barreiro LB, Gilad Y

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 26586179

Sci Rep 2015;5:16882

The innate immune system provides the first response to infection and is now recognized to be partially pathogen-specific. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is able to subvert the innate immune response and survive inside macrophages. Curiously, only 5-10% of otherwise healthy individuals infected with MTB develop active tuberculosis (TB). We do not yet understand the genetic basis underlying this individual-specific susceptibility. Moreover, we still do not know which properties of the innate immune response are specific to MTB infection. To identify immune responses that are specific to MTB, we infected macrophages with eight different bacteria, including different MTB strains and related mycobacteria, and studied their transcriptional response. We identified a novel subset of genes whose regulation was affected specifically by infection with mycobacteria. This subset includes genes involved in phagosome maturation, superoxide production, response to vitamin D, macrophage chemotaxis, and sialic acid synthesis. We suggest that genetic variants that affect the function or regulation of these genes should be considered candidate loci for explaining TB susceptibility.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26586179