Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of molecular biology

Interpreting the aggregation kinetics of amyloid peptides

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of molecular biology - 05 Jun 2006

Pellarin R, Caflisch A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 16797587

J. Mol. Biol. 2006 Jul;360(4):882-92

Amyloid fibrils are insoluble mainly beta-sheet aggregates of proteins or peptides. The multi-step process of amyloid aggregation is one of the major research topics in structural biology and biophysics because of its relevance in protein misfolding diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Creutzfeld-Jacob’s, and type II diabetes. Yet, the detailed mechanism of oligomer formation and the influence of protein stability on the aggregation kinetics are still matters of debate. Here a coarse-grained model of an amphipathic polypeptide, characterized by a free energy profile with distinct amyloid-competent (i.e. beta-prone) and amyloid-protected states, is used to investigate the kinetics of aggregation and the pathways of fibril formation. The simulation results suggest that by simply increasing the relative stability of the beta-prone state of the polypeptide, disordered aggregation changes into fibrillogenesis with the presence of oligomeric on-pathway intermediates, and finally without intermediates in the case of a very stable beta-prone state. The minimal-size aggregate able to form a fibril is generated by collisions of oligomers or monomers for polypeptides with unstable or stable beta-prone state, respectively. The simulation results provide a basis for understanding the wide range of amyloid-aggregation mechanisms observed in peptides and proteins. Moreover, they allow us to interpret at a molecular level the much faster kinetics of assembly of a recently discovered functional amyloid with respect to the very slow pathological aggregation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16797587