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© Research
Publication : Proteomics

In vivo proteome dynamics during early bovine myogenesis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proteomics - 01 Oct 2008

Chaze T, Meunier B, Chambon C, Jurie C, Picard B

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18924180

Proteomics 2008 Oct;8(20):4236-48

Myogenesis is a complex process of which the underlying mechanisms are conserved between species, including birds and mammals. Despite a good understanding of the stages of myogenesis, many of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of proliferation of the successive myoblast generations, the cellular transitions cell proliferation/alignment of myoblasts/fusion of myoblasts into myotubes/differentiation of myofibres and the control of total myofibre number still remain unknown. An in vivo proteomic analysis of the semitendinosus muscle from Charolais foetuses, at three specific stages of myogenesis (60, 110 and 180 days postconception), was conducted using 2-DE and MS. Expression profiles of more than 170 proteins were revealed and analysed using two way hierarchical clustering and statistical analysis. Our studies identify, for the first time, distinct proteins of varied biological functions and protein clusters with myogenic processes, such as the control of cell cycle activity and apoptosis, the establishment of cellular metabolism and muscle contractile properties and muscle cell reorganisation. These results are of fundamental interest to the field of myogenesis in general, and more specifically to the control of muscle development in meat producing animals.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18924180