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© Research
Publication : Progress in cell cycle research

HTLV-I Tax and cell cycle progression

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Progress in cell cycle research - 01 Jan 2000

Neuveut C, Jeang KT

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10740823

Prog Cell Cycle Res 2000;4:157-62

Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiological agent for adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and various human myopathies/neuropathies. HTLV-I encodes a 40 kDa phosphoprotein, Tax, which has been implicated in cellular transformation. In similarity with several other oncoproteins such as Myc, Jun, and Fos, Tax is a transcriptional activator. How Tax mechanistically dysregulates the cell cycle remains unclear. Recent findings from us and others have shown that Tax targets key regulators of G1/S and M progression such as p16INK4a, cyclin D1, cyclin D3-cdk, and the mitotic spindle checkpoint apparatus. Thus, Tax influences the progression of cells in various phases of the cell cycle. In this regard, we will discuss three distinct mechanisms through which Tax affects cell-cycling: a) through direct association Tax can abrogate the inhibitory function of p16INK4a on the G1-cdks, b) Tax can also directly influence cyclin D-cdk activities by a protein-protein interaction, and c) Tax targets the HsMAD1 mitotic spindle-assembly checkpoint protein. Through these varied routes, the HTLV-I oncoprotein dysregulates cellular growth controls and engenders a proclivity of cells toward a loss of DNA-damage surveillance.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10740823