Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : The Faseb Journal

Healthy Mediterranean-like dietary pattern predicts reduced risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI) in women: The Epic-France (E3N) prospective cohort study

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Faseb Journal - 01 Apr 2012

Namanjeet Ahluwalia , Laura Tondeur , Marie-Christine Boutron , and Francoise Clavel-Chaperon

Volume 26, Issue 1_supplement

Abstract
Limited data are available on the impact of overall dietary pattern on prospective risk of MI in women particularly in Europe. We conducted a prospective analysis among 71,886 women in the French E3N-EPIC study (mean age of 52.9 y at dietary assessment using a 208-item validated FFQ). During a median 11.8 y follow-up, 171 cases of incident MI were confirmed. Factor analysis identified two dietary patterns: “Western-Alcohol” (high in processed foods including meats, canned fish, butter, cream, and alcoholic beverages) and “Healthy-Mediterranean (Med)-like” (high in fruit, vegetables, non-processed fish, olive oil, and sunflower oil). Western-Alcohol pattern was not associated with MI. The absolute risk of MI was 24.8 and 12.8 per 100,000 women in the 4th and 1st quartiles of the Healthy-Med-like pattern, respectively. The hazard ratio for 4th vs 1st quartile was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.37–0.92) after adjusting for CVD risk factors, hormone-replacement therapy and energy intake. Greater adherence to a Med diet pattern may contribute to MI reduction in women. The lack of an association between Western pattern and MI may suggest that alcohol intake counterbalances the atherogenic effect of Western diet.

http://www.fasebj.org/doi/10.1096/fasebj.26.1_supplement.119.1