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© Research
Publication : Molecular endocrinology (Baltimore, Md.)

Genetic variation in androgen regulation of ornithine decarboxylase gene expression in inbred strains of mice

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular endocrinology (Baltimore, Md.) - 01 Mar 1987

Melanitou E, Cohn DA, Bardin CW, Jänne OA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 3453893

Mol. Endocrinol. 1987 Mar;1(3):266-73

Previous studies have indicated that androgen regulation of certain gene products in murine kidney is genetically controlled. In the present work, the expression of renal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene(s) was used as a biological marker to study androgen responsiveness of eight inbred strains of mice (A/J, C57BR/cdJ, 129/J, C57L/J, BALB/cJ, SM/J, RF/J, and C57BL/6J). Kidneys of untreated females from these strains did not have significantly different basal ODC activities or ODC mRNA concentrations. However, renal enzyme concentrations in intact male mice exhibited marked strain-dependent variation; three strains (RF/J, SM/J, and C57BR/cdJ) had 5- to 20-fold higher activities than the other five strains. Renal ODC mRNA content showed similar genetic variability in the male mice; animals with highest enzyme activity had higher mRNA levels than those with low activity. These results could not be explained by differences in either serum testosterone levels or renal nuclear androgen receptor content, suggesting that the animals were differentially sensitive to endogenous androgens. To evaluate further the androgen regulation of ODC gene expression, female mice were treated with testosterone-releasing implants for 5-7 days. The two strains (A/J and C57BL/6J) that had low enzyme activity in response to endogenous testosterone in male mice also showed blunted responses to exogenous androgen administration, as measured by the induction of ODC and its mRNA. The relative distribution of the two mRNA species coding for ODC (2.2 and 2.7 kb in size) exhibited strain-dependent variation that did not, however, correlate with the androgen responsiveness. Studies of the mRNA levels in reciprocal F1 hybrids of C57BR/cdJ and C57BL/6J mice suggested that androgen sensitivity of ODC gene expression, at least in these crosses, was inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3453893