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© Sandrine Etienne-Manneville
Photo prise à l'avant (dans la protrusion) d'astrocytes primaires de rat en migration. Marquage par immunofluorescence montrant en rouge, p150 Glued, une protéine associée aux extrémités 'plus' des microtubules et en vert la tubuline des microtubules. La photographie montre l'accumulation de p150 Glued à l'avant des cellules en migration, où la protéine pourrait participer à l'ancrage des microtubules à la membrane plasmique. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaires.
Publication : Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP

From bulk to plasmonic nanoparticle surfaces: the behavior of two potent therapeutic peptides, octreotide and pasireotide

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP - 18 Aug 2016

Hernández B, López-Tobar E, Sanchez-Cortes S, Coïc YM, Baron B, Chenal A, Kruglik SG, Pflüger F, Cohen R, Ghomi M

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 27537101

Phys Chem Chem Phys 2016 Sep;18(35):24437-50

Octreotide and pasireotide are two cyclic somatostatin analogues with an important clinical use in the treatment and diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors. Herein, by the combined use of several techniques (UV-visible absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, ζ-potential, transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and quantum mechanical calculations) we have followed the structural dynamics of these analogues in the bulk, as well as their binding sites on plasmonic (gold and silver) colloids. In contrast to the previously derived conclusions, the two peptides seem to possess completely different conformational features. Octreotide, a cyclic octapeptide, is formed by a moderately flexible type-II’β-turn maintained by a deformable disulfide linkage. Pasireotide, in which the cyclic character is made possible by peptide bonds, manifests a rigid backbone formed by two oppositely placed tight turns of different types, i.e.γ-turn and type-I β-turn. Owing to their cationic character, both analogues induce aggregation of negatively charged gold and silver colloids. Nevertheless, despite their notable structural differences, both peptides bind onto gold nanoparticles through their unique d-Trp residue. In contrast, their binding to silver colloids seems to be of electrostatic nature, as formed through monodentate or bidentate ionic pairs.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27537101