Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Artur Scherf
Scanning Electron Microscopy of Red Blood Cell infected by Plasmodium falciparum.
Publication : Journal of clinical microbiology

Extrapulmonary and pulmonary tuberculosis in antananarivo (madagascar): high clustering rate in female patients

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of clinical microbiology - 01 Nov 2002

Rasolofo Razanamparany V, Ménard D, Aurégan G, Gicquel B, Chanteau S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 12409359

J. Clin. Microbiol. 2002 Nov;40(11):3964-9

Antananarivo, the capital city of Madagascar, has an endemic focus of tuberculosis (TB). We specifically studied patients with extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) and grouped patients according to infected body site. The strains were characterized by IS6110 fingerprinting and compared with those isolated from patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) during the same period in order to determine the possible association between the genotype and the clinical expression of TB. A total of 316 TB patients were included in this study: 151 individuals with EPTB, 10 with both PTB and EPTB, and 155 with PTB alone. Pleural TB was the major EPTB localization (77%) and was found more often in older patients, while PTB or EPTB in which the localization was other than pleural (other EPTB) was found in younger patients. The male-to-female ratio was slightly higher in pleural TB patients (3.06:1) than in patients with other EPTB (1.35:1). There was no significant difference in the BCG status among patients with PTB, pleural TB, and other EPTB. Analysis of IS6110 patterns showed that 167 patients (52.8%) were assigned to 37 clusters of 2 to 34 patients. Analysis of the IS6110 clusters and the IS6110 families did not show any association with a particular clinical expression of the disease. Patients with PTB or other EPTB were more likely to have strains with one IS6110 copy than patients with pleural TB. The clustering rate was found to be significantly higher in female patients (62%) than in male patients (48%) (P = 0.029), suggesting that Malagasy women were more likely to progress to disease after infection than men.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12409359