Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of cell science

Emerging roles of MICAL family proteins – from actin oxidation to membrane trafficking during cytokinesis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of cell science - 03 Apr 2017

Frémont S, Romet-Lemonne G, Houdusse A, Echard A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28373242

J. Cell. Sci. 2017 May;130(9):1509-1517

Cytokinetic abscission is the terminal step of cell division, leading to the physical separation of the two daughter cells. The exact mechanism mediating the final scission of the intercellular bridge connecting the dividing cells is not fully understood, but requires the local constriction of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III-dependent helices, as well as remodelling of lipids and the cytoskeleton at the site of abscission. In particular, microtubules and actin filaments must be locally disassembled for successful abscission. However, the mechanism that actively removes actin during abscission is poorly understood. In this Commentary, we will focus on the latest findings regarding the emerging role of the MICAL family of oxidoreductases in F-actin disassembly and describe how Rab GTPases regulate their enzymatic activity. We will also discuss the recently reported role of MICAL1 in controlling F-actin clearance in the ESCRT-III-mediated step of cytokinetic abscission. In addition, we will highlight how two other members of the MICAL family (MICAL3 and MICAL-L1) contribute to cytokinesis by regulating membrane trafficking. Taken together, these findings establish the MICAL family as a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and membrane trafficking during cell division.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28373242