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© Research
Publication : Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association

Effect of nucleoside and nucleotide analogues on renal function in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus monoinfection

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association - 21 Nov 2014

Mallet V, Schwarzinger M, Vallet-Pichard A, Fontaine H, Corouge M, Sogni P, Pol S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25460550

Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2015 Jun;13(6):1181-8.e1

BACKGROUND & AIMS: There is controversy regarding whether nucleos(t)ide analogues contribute to renal impairment in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. We analyzed changes in renal function in patients with chronic HBV infection and whether these were associated with treatment or comorbidities.

METHODS: We performed a longitudinal observational study to investigate factors associated with renal function in 214 patients (median age, 43 y; 69.2% men) with compensated chronic HBV monoinfection treated with 343 lines of nucleos(t)ide analogues (210 monotherapies, 133 combinations) between 1990 and 2012 (median time, 2.4 y) in France. A linear mixed-effect model was used to model variations of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, computed with the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formula), adjusting for age, sex, geographic origin, initial liver fibrosis, level of HBV DNA, and an eGFR less than 90 mL/min/1.73 m(2).

RESULTS: The eGFR decreased in patients given adefovir dipivoxil as monotherapy or in a combination (P < .0001 and P < .002, respectively), and remained stable in patients given lamivudine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, or entecavir. The eGFR decreased in patients with a baseline eGFR of less than 90 mL/min/1.73 m2, regardless of treatment. The eGFR remained stable or increased, regardless of treatment, in patients with a baseline eGFR of 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 or greater and with an initial HBV DNA level of 100,000 IU/mL or greater. Patients born in areas of high endemicity of HBV were more prone to increases in eGFR with treatment.

CONCLUSIONS: In a real-life study, the eGFR remained stable or increased over time in patients with chronic HBV monoinfection with a baseline eGFR of 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 or higher and treated with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or entecavir. Patients born in an area of high endemicity of HBV who had initial levels of HBV DNA of 100,000 IU/mL or greater were more likely to have increased eGFR with treatment.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25460550