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© Institut Pasteur
Macrophages et lymphocytes de souris. Image colorisée.
Publication : The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Early neuronal and glial fate restriction of embryonic neural stem cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience - 01 Mar 2008

Delaunay D, Heydon K, Cumano A, Schwab MH, Thomas JL, Suter U, Nave KA, Zalc B, Spassky N

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18322099

J. Neurosci. 2008 Mar;28(10):2551-62

The question of how neurons and glial cells are generated during the development of the CNS has over time led to two alternative models: either neuroepithelial cells are capable of giving rise to neurons first and to glial cells at a later stage (switching model), or they are intrinsically committed to generate one or the other (segregating model). Using the developing diencephalon as a model and by selecting a subpopulation of ventricular cells, we analyzed both in vitro, using clonal analysis, and in vivo, using inducible Cre/loxP fate mapping, the fate of neuroepithelial and radial glial cells generated at different time points during embryonic development. We found that, during neurogenic periods [embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) to 12.5], proteolipid protein (plp)-expressing cells were lineage-restricted neuronal precursors, but later in embryogenesis, during gliogenic periods (E13.5 to early postnatal), plp-expressing cells were lineage-restricted glial precursors. In addition, we show that glial cells forming at E13.5 arise from a new pool of neuroepithelial progenitors distinct from neuronal progenitors cells, which lends support to the segregating model.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18322099