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© Research
Publication : The Journal of cell biology

Dictyostelium cell death: early emergence and demise of highly polarized paddle cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of cell biology - 24 Mar 2003

Levraud JP, Adam M, Luciani MF, de Chastellier C, Blanton RL, Golstein P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 12654899

J. Cell Biol. 2003 Mar;160(7):1105-14

Cell death in the stalk of Dictyostelium discoideum, a prototypic vacuolar cell death, can be studied in vitro using cells differentiating as a monolayer. To identify early events, we examined potentially dying cells at a time when the classical signs of Dictyostelium cell death, such as heavy vacuolization and membrane lesions, were not yet apparent. We observed that most cells proceeded through a stereotyped series of differentiation stages, including the emergence of “paddle” cells showing high motility and strikingly marked subcellular compartmentalization with actin segregation. Paddle cell emergence and subsequent demise with paddle-to-round cell transition may be critical to the cell death process, as they were contemporary with irreversibility assessed through time-lapse videos and clonogenicity tests. Paddle cell demise was not related to formation of the cellulose shell because cells where the cellulose-synthase gene had been inactivated underwent death indistinguishable from that of parental cells. A major subcellular alteration at the paddle-to-round cell transition was the disappearance of F-actin. The Dictyostelium vacuolar cell death pathway thus does not require cellulose synthesis and includes early actin rearrangements (F-actin segregation, then depolymerization), contemporary with irreversibility, corresponding to the emergence and demise of highly polarized paddle cells.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12654899