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© Research
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Development of hippocampal mossy fiber synaptic outputs by new neurons in the adult brain

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 09 Sep 2008

Faulkner RL, Jang MH, Liu XB, Duan X, Sailor KA, Kim JY, Ge S, Jones EG, Ming GL, Song H, Cheng HJ

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18780780

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2008 Sep;105(37):14157-62

New neurons are continuously generated in restricted regions of the adult mammalian brain. Although these adult-born neurons have been shown to receive synaptic inputs, little is known about their synaptic outputs. Using retrovirus-mediated birth-dating and labeling in combination with serial section electron microscopic reconstruction, we report that mossy fiber en passant boutons of adult-born dentate granule cells form initial synaptic contacts with CA3 pyramidal cells within 2 weeks after their birth and reach morphologic maturity within 8 weeks in the adult hippocampus. Knockdown of Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) in newborn granule cells leads to defects in axonal targeting and development of synaptic outputs in the adult brain. Together with previous reports of synaptic inputs, these results demonstrate that adult-born neurons are fully integrated into the existing neuronal circuitry. Our results also indicate a role for DISC1 in presynaptic development and may have implications for the etiology of schizophrenia and related mental disorders.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18780780