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© Fabrice Chrétien with Ultrapole, colorized by Jean-Marc Panaud
Cellule souche (en jaune) de muscle squelettique partiellement recouverte par la membrane basale, migrant sur une fibre musculaire (en bleu).
Publication : European journal of radiology

Breast elasticity: principles, technique, results: an update and overview of commercially available software

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in European journal of radiology - 24 Mar 2012

Balleyguier C, Canale S, Ben Hassen W, Vielh P, Bayou EH, Mathieu MC, Uzan C, Bourgier C, Dromain C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22445593

Eur J Radiol 2013 Mar;82(3):427-34

Breast ultrasound elasticity evaluation has become a routine tool in addition to diagnostic ultrasound during the last five years. Two elasticity evaluation modes are currently available: free-hand elastography and shear-wave elastography (SWE). Most of the commercially available elastography scanners have specific procedures which must be understood by the users. Free-hand elastography usually displays qualitative imaging such as an elastogram, but most of the companies now use it to quantify the relative stiffness between a lesion and the surrounding breast tissue. SWE is a new mode theoretically independent of the sonographer which displays more quantitative information, and can be useful for characterizing breast lesions. Recent studies on elastography suggest that elasticity imaging can increase B-mode accuracy and specificity in differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions. This functional imaging mode could help reduce the number of biopsies performed for benign breast lesions. This review gives a detailed description of the main commercially available systems and the results of current applications in the evaluation of breast elasticity.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22445593