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© Research
Publication : eLife

Adrenergic activation modulates the signal from the Reissner fiber to cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons during development.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in eLife - 13 Oct 2020

Cantaut-Belarif Y, Orts Del'Immagine A, Penru M, Pézeron G, Wyart C, Bardet PL,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 33048048

Link to DOI – 10.7554/eLife.59469e59469

Elife 2020 10; 9():

The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains an extracellular thread conserved in vertebrates, the Reissner fiber, which controls body axis morphogenesis in the zebrafish embryo. Yet, the signaling cascade originating from this fiber to ensure body axis straightening is not understood. Here, we explore the functional link between the Reissner fiber and undifferentiated spinal neurons contacting the CSF (CSF-cNs). First, we show that the Reissner fiber is required in vivo for the expression of urp2, a neuropeptide expressed in CSF-cNs. We show that the Reissner fiber is also required for embryonic calcium transients in these spinal neurons. Finally, we study how local adrenergic activation can substitute for the Reissner fiber-signaling pathway to CSF-cNs and rescue body axis morphogenesis. Our results show that the Reissner fiber acts on CSF-cNs and thereby contributes to establish body axis morphogenesis, and suggest it does so by controlling the availability of a chemical signal in the CSF.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33048048