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© Christelle Durand
Microscopie d'un neurone. Le marquage jaune montre les synapses.
Project

Private: Background on the genetics of ASD

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique
Starting Date
17
Feb 2016
Status
Ongoing
Members
1
Structures
1

About

Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of pervasive neurodevelopmental disorders affecting approximately 1% of the population. The diagnosis of ASD is based on impairments in reciprocal social communication and stereotyped behaviors. Behind the apparently unifying definition of ASD lies an extreme degree of clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Indeed, the core symptoms of autism rarely emerge in isolation, but usually coexist with other psychiatric and medical conditions including intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy, motor control difficulties, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), tics, anxiety, sleep disorders, or gastrointestinal problems. ASD affects more males than females; this is especially true among individuals with a normal intelligence quotient (>5:1) but less so in populations with ID (2:1), and the ratio becomes more balanced if individuals present with dysmorphic features. Individuals with ASD also exhibit alterations in sensory processing, including difficulties in the integration of information across different sensory modalities.

Twin and family studies have conclusively described ASD as the most “genetic” of neuropsychiatric disorders, with concordance rates of 82-92% in monozygotic twins versus 1-10% in dizygotic twins; sibling recurrence risk is 6%. It is now understood that autism symptoms can be caused either by gene mutations or by chromosomal aberrations. In the last years, various independent studies and large-scale international efforts have identified rare variants and copy number variants (CNVs) associated with ASD and suggested a set of mechanisms that could underlie the ASD phenotype. Using current genetic approaches such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPS) arrays, whole exome or genome sequencing, in approximately 10-25% of the cases, a genetic cause can be identified.

 At least three main biological pathways have been identified: chromatin remodeling, protein synthesis, synapse formation/function function. Mutations in the genes associated with these pathways represent risk factors for abnormal neuronal connectivity in the brain.

 

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