Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Honorary Professor
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share

The fulminant nature of Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) infections, causing meningitis and/or sepsis, suggests that the innate immune system is unable to fully control bacterial proliferation in the vasculature.

To better understand how Nm evades the immune system, we combined the use of a human skin xenograft mouse model, intravital imaging, analysis of skin biopsies by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry to assess the impact of N. meningitidis peripheral infections on the recruitment and function of neutrophils.

We observe that neutrophils accumulate at the vicinity of certain infected vessels, in which bacteria adhere to the vascular wall and auto-aggregate. While controlling to some extent the number of adherent bacteria and protecting vessels from the infection-induced vascular damage, neutrophils cannot fully fight the infection. Why? We show that this is due to the differential ability of neutrophils to be recruited to infected arterioles, capillaries and venules. The preferential recruitment of neutrophils to infected venules relies on the restricted expression of E-selectin, allowing neutrophils to phagocytose adherent meningococci and effectively control the infection. In contrast, neutrophils are barely recruited to infected arterioles and capillaries, leading to the uncontrolled proliferation of bacteria within these vessel types. Therefore, the ability of Neisseria meningitidis to colonize vascular beds in which neutrophils are poorly recruited creates a site of immune privilege allowing the progression of the infection.

Source

Colonization of dermal arterioles by Neisseria meningitidis provides a safe haven from neutrophils. Nature Communications, 27 July 2021.

To read the article: here